Player Classification Process

Factoid

Basketball started with eighteen men in a YMCA gymnasium in Springfield, Massachusetts, it has now grown into a game that more than 300 million people play worldwide.

Bedford Minor Basketball Association Player Classification Process

**PLEASE NOTE – this policy is presently being reviewed by the Executive and will be updated shortly.

Introduction
BMBA provides the opportunity for players of all skill levels to participate in the wonderful game of basketball. The BMBA is a member of the Metro Basketball Association and has teams participating in most if not all age groups and skill levels.

It is important for us to insure that our players are able to enjoy their participation in the sport of basketball. In order to achieve this the BMBA makes every effort to place players on teams where they can play with players who have similar skill levels and the opportunity for a good experience and fun is maximized.

There is no perfect process for team selection or placement. We must recognize that many of our
players are participating for the simple enjoyment being part of a team and having fun.
Alternatively, we also have many players who are highly skilled and participate to seriously improve
their skills and ultimately are looking to develop as a player and further their opportunity to play at
a high level. Additionally, we have many kids who are somewhere in the middle.

Although we have these many different skill sets, our objective is to try to insure that each player is
able to be sufficiently challenged while also having fun in a supportive setting.

If we achieve our goal of properly assessing players and placing them in the correct environment, the outcome for all parties involved (players, parents, coaches etc.) is much more satisfying. There is no benefit to having players placed on teams where they are not challenged enough, or where they simply do not have the skill set to compete successfully.

Impartiality/Fairness:
The process of team selection MUST be fair and impartial. All players must be provided with the opportunity to compete for positions on the REP ( A & B Teams ) if they want to do so. It is imperative that players are selected for these teams based upon their abilities shown during the tryout process. It is important to note that coaches are selecting a “team”. Therefore, although there may be a large number of solid guards in the tryout, we recognize that a coach cannot have 10 guards on his/her team. Therefore it is possible due to team construction that some players may not necessarily make a team although they may have a reasonably good skill set.

We also must insure that players do not make a REP team for reasons other than what they offer in
terms of their basketball related skills. The following are some examples of reasons that DO NOT qualify for selecting players:

  • They are my neighbours child and I have know them for years.
  • Their parents carpool with another solid player, therefore, I must take them both.
  • Their father/mother have offered to be my assistant coach.
  • Theses kids have played together for years and they all get along great.
Coaches:
BMBA can only be successful with the contribution of its volunteers, including its coaching staff.  We are pleased to have a combination of experienced and new coaches, as well as a combination of coaches who have coached with us in the past and experienced coaches who are new to our organization. BMBA is thankful for all of our coach volunteers, both parents and non-parents.
 
Classification Process:
Players will be offered a total of 5 training/classification sessions starting in mid September.
If there is only sufficient players for 1 team in any division, there will be no classification sessions but rather the team will simply begin practicing as a team. The first two sessions are training sessions conducted by technical trainers that are hired by the BMBA.  Coaches are not to attend these sessions as they are simply to allow players to get back into the gym and “shake the rust off”. There is no assessment conducted during these first two sessions. It is hoped that the players can come to these sessions without the worry or concern
about how they perform. The remaining three ( 3 ) sessions are where the classifications are to take place. These sessions will typically be conducted by the Coach designated to coach the A REP team. All potential
Head Coaches are to attend. Assistant coaches may only attend if they are non parent assistants
.
In addition to the Head Coaches in attendance, the BMBA will also provide an Independent Evaluator for each age group. These IE’s are people who have coached in the past or have a sound knowledge of the game
and are there to assist the coaches in assessing the players. They are also there to provide support for decisions that are made in case BMBA is questioned on particular selections.
Prior to the classification sessions, BMBA will confirm the selection of all Coaches for the A REP
teams. Some of the B REP team coaches may be designated as well. Further appointments for Head Coaching positions will typically be made based upon determination of team structure. That is to say that parents
who have volunteered to coach their son/daughter will have to wait until their child is placed before determining which team they will coach.  Parent coaches SHOULD NOT evaluate their own children. The other coaches and the IE can make assessments of those particular players and determine where they fit.
 
Classification Session 1
During this session all of the players should practice together. If there are a large number of players registered in a specific age group, the players will be divided by alphabet (for example: A-L, M-Z) and split sessions will be run. There should be no separation of players based upon skills during this session. Coaches should attempt to get a look at everyone and at this stage no one is to be excluded from the mix. After this session the coaches and the IE should spend some time after the session to talk about specific players. It is hoped that after the first session that the players who are obviously more skilled and also the players who are least skilled can be determined. However, there is likely going to be a significant number of players in the middle who will more difficult to assess. At this stage there should still be no determination as to players being set on any specific
team.
 
Classification Session 2
Large Group
Based upon the previous session, the coaches will have separated the players into two groups. The first is the strongest players from Session 1, along with some of other players who are in the mix but need more of a look. The other group will be the less skilled players and more the players in the middle of the pack. All players, regardless of which session they are in, shall continue to be objectively reviewed for their skills. It is likely that some players who showed really well/poorly in the first practice may perhaps be quite different in the second session. Again, no final decisions are to be made, although the A REP team coach should be formulating a general idea as to his top 7 or 8 players, and also have some idea as to the next 7 or 8 beyond that. After these sessions, the coaches should once again gather after the session to discuss the players and where they fit. There should be some consensus as to the top and bottom part of the group.
 
Small Group
This session will run similar to the larger group, however, there will only be one gym time and all players will be in the same gym. Coaches may split the players up for running drills or doing half court scrimmages. Similar to above, you would typically have your strongest players and middle players competing against each other, rather than having the strongest and weakest competing head to head. Players can be moved around to insure that everyone with an appropriate skill level gets a fair opportunity to compete against the strongest players.
 
Classification Session 3
Large Group
This will be the final opportunity to assess players. After session 2, the coaches should shuffle up the players once again. The middle of the pack players who trained in the weaker group for session two should be in the stronger group for Session 3 so that they have a chance to show their skills with the stronger players. Some of the middle players who trained with the stronger players for session 2 will move to train with the second group. This way all of the players who have some chance at being on the REP teams have had an opportunity to compete against the stronger players.
 
PLEASE NOTE THAT NO PLAYER SHALL BE ELIGIBLE TO BE SELECTED FOR A REP ( A or B ) TEAM IF
THEY HAVE NOT PARTICPATED IN A CLASSIFICATION SESSION WITH THE STRONGER PLAYERS.
 
Additonally, players who are seeking spots on the REP teams MUST attend at least 2 out of the 3 Classification sessions. If they do not attend at least two sessions, they are ineligible to be selected for the REP teams.
 
Small Group
Similar idea to the Session 2. Players will all train together in one gym, however, some drills and scrimmages can be done in separate groups in half court. Most players should be able to be shuffled between groups to insure that all players have a fair chance.
 
Team Construction
At the end of the final session the Coaches and the IE must meet to make final decisions on players.  The REP Team A Coach will finalize their team first. They should also assist in the selection of the other teams in their age group. The B team will finalize next. The team selection process should be done by consensus. The coaches and IE should be comfortable with players selected for each team. As per the previous section on Impartiality/Fairness, the BMBA realize that coaches may be looking to round out their rosters with players that provide specific skills or characteristics. The final roster for one coach may not have necessarily have been the final roster for a different coach. However, the core of the team should be agreed upon, with the Head Coach able to refine the team with the selections of the final spots.
There are typically 12–14 players who could reasonably obtain a spot on a roster of 10 or 11 for most REP teams. The top 7 or 8 are usually obvious choices, with the remaining spots left to the determination by the Head Coach with the assistance of the IE.
 
REC Team Selections
Through experience the Board of the BMBA has learned that having players with significant gaps in skill levels on the same team can be frustrating for these players. More skilled players who are on a REC team with players who may be new to the game or who are limited in their skill level tend to get frustrated and unmotivated at practices. Similarly, those less skilled players who are on teams with players who are much more skilled tend to lose confidence when attempting to compete during practices and games. Often times, the less skilled players do not have the opportunity to handle the ball much during games and therefore, do not develop their skills.
Therefore, the BMBA recommends that for situations where there may be two or more REC teams in a given age group, that these teams should be tiered as well. That is to say that they should be divided in a C and D manner rather than attempting to make two balanced teams with a mix of more skilled players with those less skilled players. In the end, both groups will have a more satisfying season with this scenario as they will be playing with and against players/teams of equal skill.  If the REC coaches feel that the skill gap is not very wide, or that there is not enough skilled players remaining in the group, they may construct balanced teams.
 
 
REC Team Selections
Through experience the Board of the BMBA has learned that having players with significant gaps in skill levels on the same team can be frustrating for these players. More skilled players who are on a REC team with players who may be new to the game or who are limited in their skill level tend to get frustrated and unmotivated at practices. Similarly, those less skilled players who are on teams with players who are much more skilled tend to lose confidence when attempting to compete during practices and games. Often times, the less skilled players do not have the opportunity to handle the ball much during games and therefore, do not develop their skills.
Therefore, the BMBA recommends that for situations where there may be two or more REC teams in a given age group, that these teams should be tiered as well. That is to say that they should be divided in a C and D manner rather than attempting to make two balanced teams with a mix of more skilled players with those less skilled players. In the end, both groups will have a more satisfying season with this scenario as they will be playing with and against players/teams of equal skill.
 
If the REC coaches feel that the skill gap is not very wide, or that there is not enough skilled players
remaining in the group, they may construct balanced teams.
 
** This protocol is subject to change by the approval of the Board of the BMBA